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Snape: Bad or Good?
    “But you think you’re right?” said Harry.

    “Naturally I do, but as I have already proven to you, I make mistakes
like the next man.  In fact, being—forgive me—rather cleverer than most men,
my mistakes tend to be correspondingly huger.”
Half-Blood Prince
Chapter 10
Half-Blood Prince
Chapter 16
                   
                                                                                                                                                          
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Ginny Weasley here, the first ever guest blogger on Books and Wands.

With only days left before we discover the much anticipated truth about Severus Snape, it feels
necessary to review the facts we’ve already learned about the infamous Hogwarts teacher.

Let’s dip, for a moment, into my pensieve...
While rereading Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, already aware of its grim ending, this
Dumbledore quote hit me like a dementor getting hit with a really powerful patronus charm.

Was this J.K.’s covert way of explaining why Dumbledore, whom Harry has deemed the greatest
sorcerer in the world, had trusted Snape for so many years without discovering his traitorous
secret?  

Or is that only what she wants us to think?  

Did J.K. plan to convince her audience that Dumbledore had made a tremendous mistake, only
to increase the amount of shock and surprise the reader would feel upon discovering two years
later that Snape had been good all along?  

There can only be, after all, one ending to her world-renowned
Harry Potter series. I’m sure that,
much like the ending of
The Sopranos, Seinfeld, and Star Wars, she would like it’s conclusion to be
the topic of conversation for days, weeks, and even years after its release.

Before the Snape controversy of Book 6, there was little room for a shocking ending.  After all,
Harry is clearly good and Voldemort is clearly bad.  What’s so shocking about that?

So, Snape—bad or good?

Personally, I’m hoping for the latter.  I admit—I am seeing this from a teacher’s perspective.  I
eerily enjoyed Harry being wrong about Snape in the first five books because Dumbledore told
Harry that Snape was good, and THE TEACHER IS ALWAYS RIGHT!!

Here’s one possible assumption: After Voldemort had returned at the end of the
Goblet of Fire,
Dumbledore asked Snape to return to the Death Eaters as a spy.  

Dumbledore must’ve also instructed Snape to keep his cover, no matter what gruesome task
Voldemort asked of him.  

Maybe Dumbledore’s pleas at the end of
Half-Blood Prince are not for Snape to spare him but to
actually carry out his task and keep his disguise intact.  After all—
    “DON’T—” screamed Snape, and his face was suddenly demented,
inhuman, as though he was in as much pain as he yelping, howling dog stuck in
the burning house behind them—“CALL ME COWARD!”
Half-Blood Prince
Chapter 28
It’s very likely that Snape would become increasingly agitated to hear himself being called a
coward, knowing full well he was in the middle of the bravest thing he’d ever done in his entire
life.

Either way, it’s safe to say Snape is going to play one major role in Book 7...

...maybe even a deadly one?
I am very proud to announce that I, the amazing Ginny Weasley, found a grammar mistake in
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
“Please, come in, sit down, Minister!” fluttered Mrs. Weasley, straightening
her hat. Have a little purkey, or some tooding....I mean—”
Naturally, there should be quotes before the word have so that we realize it is once again Mrs.
Weasley’s dialogue and not JK’s narration.

Just thought I’d share...
Special thank you to the real Ginny Weasley for this wonderful contribution to the site.